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Women In Mining Infographic

08/05/2017BY: Tracey Mesken

​Women in mining only make up 15% of the sector. We know as an industry we have to do better and if we want things to change it's up to us to lead the way.

WorkPac surveyed 675 women in Western Australia to understand what attracts them to the mining industry and what their work preferences are.

These results will shape recruitment strategies to increase participation of women in mining the workforce.

Our Women in Mining infographic shows what they said ...

 

women in mining wa

  WorkPac together with Fortescue Metals Group, a global leader in the mining market, are reaching out to women who have ever thought about a career in mining or who are considering a return to the industry. Click here to register your interest in working for WorkPac at one of Fortescue Metals' mines. Why is this important? Why is it critical to have women in mining? Gender parity in the workplace is not only an issue of fairness but is about attracting the best talent. Women account for half the world's population and if they don't achieve their full economic potential, our economy suffers, says the McKinsey Global Institute. If you're excluding half the population from your recruitment process, you're simply not hiring from the best talent pool available. A study by the McKinsey Global Institute finds that the world economy could add $12 trillion in growth over the next decade if countries meet the best-in-region scores for improving women’s participation in the labor force. The Credit Suisse Research Institute found that companies with female directors on the board outperformed all-male boards across growth, productivity and return on equity. This doesn't just apply to our boardrooms. Teams with lower percentages of women have lower sales and lower profits than teams with a balanced gender mix. Performance and productivity is higher across gender neutral crews, teams and departments.

The correlation between gender balanced teams and financial performance is addressed in many studies, examples can be found at the Australian Government's Workplace Gender Equality Agency and Harvard University's Kennedy School to name a few.

Last year, Fortescue Mining Group appointed two new female directors, former Leighton executive Penny Bingham-Hall and Deloitte partner Jennifer Morris, to replace two men retiring from the board.

Six of the 10 board of directors are women and Fortescue’s chairman and founder, Andrew Forrest, told Women's Agenda that the diversity of the board has been critical and "a natural evolution" for the company.

Fortescue’s share price grew by 400 per cent in 2016 and Mr Forrest says while merit-based hiring is a given, "diversity is an extremely strong factor in merit. If you have no women on your board and you are looking at a new director with approximately equal skills, for the sake of your shareholders choose diversity."

Interested in mining jobs in WA? Click here to search resources jobs in Western Australia.

Sources:

http://www.mckinsey.com/global-themes/employment-and-growth/how-advancing-womens-equality-can-add-12-trillion-to-global-growth

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/companies/boardroom-gender-balance-improving-but-much-work-to-do/news-story/b51e1aaaf18398362e983b7fe584b797

https://womensagenda.com.au/latest/eds-blog/how-fortescue-metal-has-a-board-dominated-by-women/

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